KEW Curiosity Series Interview 3: DJ Doran

I met DJ Doran when he reached out to interview me about my podcast. We hit it off rather quickly, and of course I had to have him on to discuss Curiosity.

In fact, the whole Curiosity interview series was inspired by DJ!

See, DJ told me my podcast made him curious, and he’s a very curious guy as you’ll see. And I realized that I am driven, in large part, by curiosity. It’s in my daily life, it’s in my music, and it’s in KEW. But I had never thought about it, and certainly hadn’t realized it.

DJ is an amazing guy. After a successful career as a pilot in the Air Force Reserves, he has become a leader and visionary in the LGBTQ community. He has lived on a sailboat. He has a daughter. He’s the model of professionalism, yet super laid back. He’s knowledgeable as hell, but maintains a natural curiosity about the world around us.

Curiosity is funny like that. It isn’t obvious. Some people have it and others don’t seem to care. For people like DJ and me, we sort of automatically bring curiosity into our daily endeavors. We can’t help it. It’s natural. And, as DJ will explain, curiosity can be very nuanced.

Curiosity can be brave. It can be scary. And it carries with it a certain responsibility to grow.

Curiosity can reveal who your real friends are. It is our ally.

But I’m letting my curiosity be too verbose.

To maintain the organic nature of our chat, I include the entire conversation here. I apologize for my audio, which is distorted, but DJ sounds great.

Please explore DJ’s work. You can find links to most of what he does on his facebook site (his podcast) and at Aequalitas media (his media company).

I hope you enjoy listening to or watching the interview as much as we did doing it.

Full podcast audio download here:

or via Stitcher, Spotify, Apple, Google, etc.

Full YouTube video here:

Feel free to click the comment link above and share your thoughts!

Preview KEW Episode 42: Safety

One of our basic human needs is to feel safe. I realized recently that I created my own safety as a kid in response to bullying. My thirteen-year-old self built a protective cocoon my bedroom filled with all the things I loved and valued. Maybe all teenagers do this, but looking back at those years I realized how necessary it was. Here’s this kid who’s feeling alone and isolated because he’s being bullied and doesn’t know how to do anything about it. So instead of getting depressed or acting out, he builds a place where he can feel safe, has value, and matters.

And though our lives change as we mature, those longings never go away. As an adult I an no longer bullied but carry the scars of isolation and reduced self-esteem. In some ways I have overcome those issues, yet in other ways I have not. And though i feel safe with my family and friends, I’d really like to feel the safety of my thirteen-year-old bedroom again.

It all makes me wonder, does our need for safety change as we age? Does it ever go away? Should it?

Preview video here: https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=353397339094032

Full episode Friday

KEW Episode 39: The Growth Fallacy

With respect to economics, people often say that you have to grow to stay in business. I heard this a lot when I tried to run my business at a static level of production (i.e., no growth). I found that we actually HAD MORE MONEY left over when we controlled expenses and held production at the level of demand. I discovered that we spent so much money on growth that we were more profitable when we didn’t have those line items. Imagine that!

So it bugs me when people adhere to that mantra: Grow or Die! It not only doesn’t make sense, it can be detrimental.

Take human population size. The more people, the more resources are consumed, and the more damage is done to our home. Now, we could certainly do this differently, but there is a concept called Carrying Capacity that says any population in a given area can only be as large as the resources available to support it.

So growth can be bad.

Now, I’m only talking about growth that consumes resources here. Personal growth. Learning. Musical ability. There are many types of growth that are healthy and, I believe, essential to humanity. But when considering consumptive growth, we absolutely have to start accounting for true resource use – after all, accounting is a critical part of business, right? And I argue that we have done some pretty poor accounting when it comes to big business and the environment.

Podcast download: https://pdcn.co/e/https://chtbl.com/track/CGDA9D/www.buzzsprout.com/530563/7398811-kew-episode-39-the-growth-fallacy.mp3?blob_id=32331385&download=true

Or, I’m on most of the podcast servers like Stitcher or Apple Podcasts.

YouTube video link: https://youtu.be/n2rGWiVQx3c

FLASHBACK! KEW Episode 8: Goals and Accolades

And a little bit about the meaning of life . . . .

Many of us could use a little more self esteem. Yet we continually look for esteem outside ourselves in the external environment.

For me, it was attention from the opposite sex. Or getting hired by a good employer. Or publishing a paper. These things are well and good, but they are also fleeting.

It’s like your mom telling you your handsome. Or when everyone gets a trophy. It’s not our fault.

I struggle to ‘know’ that I am good regardless of my achievements and seek to learn how to self-validate my worth.

All that and more. Preview link here: https://business.facebook.com/kpluseiswise/videos/658581378406198/

Full episode here: https://chrisburcher.com/2020/06/12/episode-8-goals-accolades-and-the-meaning-of-life/

Episode 8: Goals, Accolades, and the Meaning of Life?

I struggle with getting praise for my accomplishments. Earning money, having a ‘good job’, winning trophies, making people like you, achieving, getting good grades – so much of life is tied to ‘chasing carrots’ to earn accolades.

In my youth my accolades were mostly self-realized. I was such a loner I had to learn to praise myself and realize my own accomplishments. These achievements were measured in things like satisfaction and happiness. But somewhere along the lines I switched over to external gratification and fell into a pretty big trap where I could never achieve enough to get enough praise to feel good about myself.

Those scenarios area little exaggerated, but you get the point.

As I age I realize my youthful naïveté was a better modus operandi. Now I am trying to relearn how to ‘esteem myself’ and appreciate my achievements from within myself and my close friends and family.

I argue that society goes through similar cycles and recent events put us right in the crosshairs for some serious self-reflection about what we really want out of life.

Podcast audio:

Youtube video: